Friday, July 06, 2007

Online storage services

I am going to setup automatic backup of an application I have hosted at an ISP. I was thinking about simply buying some remote disk storage somewhere, and periodically doing a simple scp or rsync of data.

I asked around and took a quick sweep on the net, which gave me this list:

OmniDrive
Requires either a special client (available for windows and mac only) or use of a simple web api. There seems to be no ssh-based api.

OmniDrive currently provides a 1GB free account.

Mozy
Same as with OmniDrive that it requires a special client to be downloaded and installed. Their client seems to have focus as a kind of backup application, in that it actually has features like backup in the background, and only transfer of modified blocks in files. In addition, you actually need to use mozyPro if you are a company.

Mozy currently provides a 2GB free account.

Strongspace
Now here is something in the lines of what I need. Their api is ssh-based, accepting sftp and rsync over ssh, which is just what I want. Aside from their apparent integration with basecamp, their focus seems to be providing a remote-disk, which is nice and simple.

Strongspace currently provides no free or trial account.

Xdrive
From what I can read, their focus is not as simple as strongspace, but I must admit that some of their features are cool. For instance, you can provide your email account information in their client, and xdrive will automatically strip off attachments from your emails and save them in your xdrive space. Real nice feature, but not at all what I need now :-)

Xdrive is an AOL service, so you need an AOL screen name. I cannot find any information about ssh-based uploads, so I assume it is not there. Hmmm.

Amazon S3
They call it "Storage for the Internet". Sadly, they seem to only provide REST and SOAP based apis (which is fine, just not for me right now). In addition to this, they have a pricing model based on both per GB storage used and per GB data transferred in and out. I like a more flat rate price model.

So, I think I will go with strongspace, as it looks like a ... strong solution. Would like to hear from anyone with actual experience in this field though!?

7 comments:

cubrilovic said...

Hi Per, I am the CEO of Omnidrive. Our user accounts do support SSH - if you are a pro user ($40 per year for 10GB) your account will always use SSH

If you use our API, you can also use SSH - and for synching or backing up UNIX servers we have omni-synch.pl

We dont support SSH or SCP, as that isn't what we are about - but we do have webdav, ssh and Omnidrive API support and you can then access your storage using our web interface and desktop clients, etc.

Feel free to email me on nik [at] omnidrive.com if you have any questions

Per Olesen said...

Hi cubrilovic,

Thank you for clearing that up!

Regards, Per

Anonymous said...

Hi,

Good posting.

I have been reading about the online backup industry for a while now.

Online backup is maturing and slowly getting the attention of the general consumer.

One website worth mentioning is the backup review site:

http://www.BackupReview.info

This very informative site, not only posts up to date news and articles from the industry, but also lists about 400 online backup companies and ranks the top 25 on a monthly basis.

The site now covers storage in general, not just online backup.

Could you please feature this site and post a review so that your readers will be aware of its services.

I enjoy reading your posts. Keep it up!

Anonymous said...

Check out rsync.net. They do rsync, ftp/sftp/scp, rdiff-backup and WebDAV.

Very reasonable price too just $1.60
GB/month.

No connection, just a happy customer.

Tim.

Per Olesen said...

Tim: Thanks for the tip. Looks like a nice service. Too late though, as I just went with strongspace :-)

Anonymous said...

I also have to recommend rsync.net. It's not the cheapest (although it is close...) but it is by far the most clueful and open offsite backup platform.

I can run unix commands, remotely, over SSH to interact with my data, I can use any SSh-based tool that I care to (scp, sftp) and I can even pipeline commands in unix over SSH.

If you know what you're doing, and you want real flexibility, they're doing it the "right way".

Anonymous said...

I would recommend eCrypt.me it also serves as a secure online data storage. It is a web-based software-as-a-service which means you can access your files anytime and anywhere internet is available! It uses one way encryption, no backdoors to ensure safety and security of your account. It's great and worth checking out!